Rhubarb Strawberry Dutch Baby German Pancakes

Our Strawberry Dutch Baby recipe is a family brunch dish favourite during the summer.

We use local Ontario strawberries from the province’s Strawberry Capital, Norfolk County, as well as stalks of rhubarb grown in our own backyard garden.

At breakfast, serve each slice of Rhubarb Strawberry Dutch Baby with sliced berries and maple syrup. For dessert, serve the light and crispy German pancake with a scoop of strawberry ice cream.

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Save our Strawberry Dutch Baby Recipe to Pinterest!

History of Pancakes

Pancakes are most commonly recognized as a breakfast and brunch dish in America and Canada. They’ve been around for centuries, a staple in many cultural diets.

Pancakes began over 30,000 years ago during the Stone Age. Culinary historians have found pancakes in the stomach of Otzi the Iceman, human remains dating back 5,300 years.

In ancient Greece and Rome, pancakes were made from wheat flour, olive oil, honey, and curdled milk. Ancient Greek poets, Cratinus and Magnes wrote about pancakes in their poetry. Shakespeare even mentions them in his famous plays. During the English Renaissance pancakes were flavoured with spices, rosewater, sherry, and apples.

The name pancake started being used in the 15th century but became standard in 19th century America. Perviously, they were called indian cakes, hoe cakes, johnnycakes, journey cakes, buckwheat cakes, buckwheats, griddle cakes, and flapjacks.

Early American pancakes were made with buckwheat or cornmeal. Thomas Jefferson loved them so much he sent a special recipe to his home town from the White House.

Today, families around the world enjoy a morning meal featuring stacked banana and cherry pancakes. You can find both sweet and savoury pancakes all over the world, from spicy Vietnamese crepes to fluffy Strawberry Dutch Baby.

Ingredients you'll need to make our Rhubarb Strawberry Dutch Baby recipe.
Ingredients you’ll need to make our Rhubarb Strawberry Dutch Baby recipe.

What Is a Dutch Baby?

A Dutch Baby, sometimes also called a German Pancake, Bismarck, or Dutch Puff, is a large American popover, similar to Yorkshire Pudding.

Compared to a typical pancake, a Dutch Baby is baked in the oven in a cast-iron skillet, rather than fried on both sides over a griddle or stove. It is generally thicker than most pancakes and contains no leavening agents like baking powder or baking soda.

Dutch Baby batter is thin like crepe batter, rather than thick like traditional American flapjacks. The German pancake rises in a very hot oven thanks to the recipes egg content.

The idea of a Dutch Baby is said to have been derived from the German Pfannkuchen, but the current form originated in the US in the early 1900s.

According to Sunset Magazine, Dutch Babies were introduced in the first half of the 1900s at Manca’s Cafe, a family restaurant in Seattle. While these pancakes are derived from the German pancake dish, it is said that the name Dutch Baby was coined by one of the owners daughter, where “Dutch” was her corruption of the German autonym “deutsch.” Manca’s Cafe claimed that it owned the trademark for the Dutch Baby in 1942.

Prepare Strawberry Dutch Baby batter in a blender.
Prepare Strawberry Dutch Baby batter in a blender.

Homemade Rhubarb Strawberry Dutch Baby

We love making pancakes and crepes at home.

We’ve shared our favourite recipes including Chocolate Cherry PancakesSourdough Discard Pancakes & WafflesVietnamese CrepesVegan Indian Pudla, Mango Blueberry Coconut Crepes, Banana Oat Flour Pancakes and Green Onion Cake.

This homemade Rhubarb Strawberry Dutch Baby recipe is a quick & easy recipe to make for your family during breakfast or brunch.

Tired of standing over a griddle in the morning to flip endless stacks of pancakes? You can make our Dutch Baby recipe in a flash, simply pouring the batter from your blender into a buttered skillet and baking it in the oven.

Strawberry Dutch Baby are crispy and browned on the outside and when cooked to perfection feature a light and fluffy interior.

Pour German pancake batter into a cast iron skillet filled with melted butter.
Pour German pancake batter into a cast iron skillet filled with melted butter.
Top Dutch Baby batter with sliced strawberry and rhubarb.
Top Dutch Baby batter with sliced strawberry and rhubarb.

My Family Loves German Pancakes

The first time I tasted a Dutch Baby was on a California road trip with my dad at a popular brunch restaurant in San Diego.

The restaurant’s signature dish was a Dutch Baby topped with sliced Granny Smith apples and drizzled in caramel sauce. Guests were advised at the table that the dish takes 30 minutes to prepare from scratch. It seemed like everyone was more than happy to patiently wait, it was that good!

Since that memorable road trip I’ve encountered Dutch Baby recipes served at popular brunch restaurants and dessert menus.

My family enjoys eating this Dutch Baby recipe year round. We get creative with the fruit pairings, being sure to use fresh fruit that reflects what’s in season at local farms.

Serve Strawberry Dutch Baby immediately after taking it out of the oven to avoid deflation.
Serve Strawberry Dutch Baby immediately after taking it out of the oven to avoid deflation.
The best Strawberry Dutch Baby features a light interior and crunchy browned exterior.
The best Strawberry Dutch Baby features a light interior and crunchy browned exterior.

Tips For Making Our Strawberry Dutch Baby Recipe

My family loves to eat German pancakes all year round. Strawberry and rhubarb are a perfect pairing in the summer. We also like to serve the pancake topped with Niagara cherries and peaches in July and August.

In the Fall, serve this Dutch Baby by swapping out the strawberries and rhubarb with sliced apples and pears.

In the winter, prepare festive Dutch Baby at Christmas featuring orange and cranberry, Baileys, Eggnog or cinnamon sugar.

If it’s your first time making a Strawberry Dutch Baby take note of these baking tips:

  • Use a large cast iron skillet as it maintains a higher heat than a typical casserole dish.
  • Only use butter when greasing the pan as it adds a sweet flavour to the crispy underside of the Dutch Baby.
  • Do not adjust the batter ingredients as the proportion of flour to milk and egg ensures the pancake will rise.
  • Slice the strawberries and rhubarb so they are small. This makes the Dutch Baby easier to eat as the juicy fruit will be incorporated throughout the batter evenly.
  • We use a blender to quickly prepare the crepe batter but you could also use a large mixing bowl and whisk.
  • Make sure your oven reaches 425 degrees before adding the skillet to the oven. This ensures the Strawberry Dutch Baby rises into a dramatic eye-catching puff!
  • Serve immediately as Dutch Babies quickly deflate at room temperate.
Use a sharp knife and pie server to plate each slice of the homemade German Pancake.
Use a sharp knife and pie server to plate each slice of the homemade German Pancake.

What To Serve With Strawberry Dutch Baby

Dutch Baby are traditionally served with a squeeze of lemon, dab of butter, sprinkling of powdered sugar or maple syrup.

You can easily transform your favourite breakfast Dutch Baby recipe into a dessert by serving each slice alongside a scoop of ice cream, gelato or sorbet.

We like to serve this Rhubarb Strawberry Dutch Baby with maple syrup, sliced strawberries, lemon gelato or strawberry sorbet.

If you’re making a Dutch Baby in the Fall or Winter with pears and apples, feel free to drizzle with caramel sauce and top with chopped roasted walnuts, pecans or hazelnuts.

You can add flavourings to the batter such as almond extract, which pairs nicely with cherries and peaches. During the holidays we like to enjoy a boozy breakfast by adding a few teaspoons of Baileys or Eggnog to the batter.

Serve our easy Dutch Baby recipe with sliced strawberries and maple syrup for breakfast.
Serve our easy Dutch Baby recipe with sliced strawberries and maple syrup for breakfast.

Storing Leftover Dutch Baby German Pancakes

The pancake will deflate once out of the oven but leftovers can be enjoyed by reheating in a toaster or oven. Don’t microwave leftover Dutch Baby slices you’ll miss out on the desired crispy and crunchy texture.

Store leftover Strawberry Dutch Baby slices in an airtight container or resealable bag in the fridge for 2-3 days.

Serve our Strawberry Dutch Baby with sliced berries, maple syrup and ice cream for dessert.
Serve our Strawberry Dutch Baby with sliced berries, maple syrup and ice cream for dessert.

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Best Strawberry Dutch Baby Recipe

Print Recipe
5 from 3 votes

Rhubarb Strawberry Dutch Baby

Looking for the best summer Strawberry Dutch Baby? Our quick & easy German pancake recipe is topped with berries and rhubarb.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time25 mins
Course: Breakfast, Dessert
Cuisine: American, canadian, german
Keyword: Dutch Baby, German Pancake Recipe, Rhubarb Dutch Baby, Rhubarb Strawberry Dutch Baby, Strawberry Dutch Baby
Servings: 6
Calories: 346kcal

Equipment

  • Cast Iron Skillet
  • oven
  • Frech knife
  • measuring spoon
  • measuring cup
  • blender
  • spatula

Ingredients

  • 6 tbsp butter
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup All purpose flour
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup rhubarb chopped
  • 1/2 cup strawberries sliced

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. While the oven is preheating, place the butter in a cast iron skillet and place in the oven to melt.
  • Place the eggs, milk, flour, vanilla, and salt in a blender and blend until completely smooth, about 2 minutes. The longer you blend, the fluffier your German pancake will be.
  • Pour the batter over the melted butter in the cast iron skillet. Arrange chopped rhubarb and sliced strawberries on top.
  • Bake in preheated oven until puffy and golden brown, about 20-25 minutes.
  • Serve hot with maple syrup and whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

Nutrition

Calories: 346kcal | Carbohydrates: 17.7g | Protein: 12.4g | Fat: 25.3g | Saturated Fat: 13.8g | Cholesterol: 296mg | Sodium: 536mg | Potassium: 218mg | Fiber: 1.1g | Sugar: 4.5g | Calcium: 131mg | Iron: 2mg

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